Secretly Distributon

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Release Date
2017-02-17
PVT: New Spirit

PVT, known as Pivot to anyone in the know, are an act that's embraced technology at every turn - gritty, new, confronting - and their uncompromised songwriting and musical understanding have seen their first four albums released to global acclaim. After years of touring, the band wound up cast far and wide, residing each in a different continent. 2017 sees members Dave Miller along with brothers Richard & Laurence Pike return home to Australia with their fifth album, New Spirit.

This album contains that beautiful type of music written out of compulsion, a calling and an impulse to explore the new place that Australia has become -- a hotbed for political and cultural intolerance. The country has succumbed to divisive politics and irrational fear. Obvious fraud and immorality driven by a gutless media and an indifferent public.

PVT's uncompromising approach to musical self-determination has never been this sharp, and especially never this political. The sound of the record itself is that of a stark digital future, but under the surface there's nostalgia for a different time, another way of thinking, another life. PVT are exploring. Expanding on expectations. They carry with them the bravery and courage of the old explorer with the tolerance and understanding of the new. And they want you to join them.

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Artist
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Release Date
2013-06-11
PVT: Vertigo

Last we heard of Australian three-piece PVT, they were exploring the outer reaches of electronic rock with their 2010 album Church With No Magic. The Australian trio have made a distinguished career out of making genre-bending guitar music, carving themselves a reputation as sonic innovators, and in 2008 becoming the first band from their homeland to sign to iconic UK label Warp. All of which makes their new album Homosapien — their fourth studio album and Felte debut — a startling listening.

"Vertigo" is a standout track from said album. The initial synth line appears in slow-mo and is then smoothed out with a bassline which pulls you in from the beginning and never lets go. Techno producer Luke Abbott takes a hold of this synth sound and takes these ideas and stretches them out with great patience over several minutes without it ever losing its momentum or focus. Beat constructionist Lukid creates a tumbling beat and pitches up the vocals while Hype Williams re-imagine the track entirely, casting it as the backdrop to a new set of vocals and movie sample snippets. Van Vizintin creates a moody, electronic recreation of the original.

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Release Date
2013-02-19
PVT: Homosapien

Last we heard of Australian three-piece PVT, they were exploring the outer reaches of electronic rock with their 2010 album Church With No Magic. The Australian trio have made a distinguished career out of making genre-bending guitar music, carving themselves a reputation as sonic innovators. All of which made their new album Homosapien — their fourth studio album and Felte debut — a startling listening. The difference is apparent from the instant you hit play on Homosapien: Richard Pike is singing. PVT's records have featured vocals in the past of course, but this is the first release that's placed Pike front and centre as a bona fide frontman. The change provides his band's sound with a focal point that allows Homosapien to be more open, more intimate and yet also more direct than its predecessors. This is the document of a band as close as ever to defining ‘their sound’: a seamless collage of instruments, electronics, old keyboards and machines, and Pike's voice.

Title
Artist
Label
Release Date
2013-02-19
PVT: Homosapien

Last we heard of Australian three-piece PVT, they were exploring the outer reaches of electronic rock with their 2010 album Church With No Magic. The Australian trio have made a distinguished career out of making genre-bending guitar music, carving themselves a reputation as sonic innovators. All of which made their new album Homosapien — their fourth studio album and Felte debut — a startling listening. The difference is apparent from the instant you hit play on Homosapien: Richard Pike is singing. PVT's records have featured vocals in the past of course, but this is the first release that's placed Pike front and centre as a bona fide frontman. The change provides his band's sound with a focal point that allows Homosapien to be more open, more intimate and yet also more direct than its predecessors. This is the document of a band as close as ever to defining ‘their sound’: a seamless collage of instruments, electronics, old keyboards and machines, and Pike's voice.