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2018-10-12
Mountain Movers: Pink Skies

"Pink Skies", the seventh album from New Haven quartet Mountain Movers, comes closest to capturing what makes The Movers such a thrilling live band, padding the instrumental passages of their primordial psychedelia with lumbering numbers like "Snow Drift" or "My Eyes Are Always Heavy", that stumble forward lead-footed, soaked in a cacophonous clamor with songwriter/guitarist Dan Greene's lyrics floating atop like couplets of magical realism. "Pink Skies" coalesces midway through with long-form jammer "The Other Side of Today", an epic near-twelve minute masterclass in modern, improvised guitar music; the rhythm section of drummer Ross Menze & bassist Rick Omonte sizzles like an acid-fried sunset, and lead guitarist Kryssi Battalene showcases what makes her one of the most enchanting guitarists in the game right now (ask a "head", they'll tell ya). A player able to vacillate between low-key solos that crackle to head-splitting, ear-piercing noise, riding that ever-so-thin line between expertly controlled feedback & chaotic discord. The album's final two tracks "This City" and "Heavenly Forest" blend so seamlessly into one another that all of "Pink Skies" second side feels like one long piece of elemental sonic alchemy.

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2017-05-05
Mountain Movers: Mountain Movers

The Mountain Movers have, over the course of five albums steadily become New Haven's best kept secret; a band capable of lurching between melancholic indie rock, strident garage/psych and pummeling guitar freak-fuckery. This, their s/t sixth album coalesces the band's vision so succinctly and perfectly, it makes you wonder where they’re been your whole life. "Mountain Movers" starts off with the dark, stormy fourteen minute track "I Could Really See Things". Fading into view with a scree of feedback, the drums and bass start to pound and pummel until the song lurches forward, lumbering purposefully toward slashes of guitar improvisation. Then, in a flash comes the jangling, melodic strum of "Everyone Cares" the a brief "Intro" and "Angels Don't Worry" is next up, finding that sweet spot between murky kraut-tinged psychedelia and acid-fried guitar-noise exploration. "Vision Television" pounds out succinct garage stomp and heavy VU-inflected swagger. The album is bookended by "Jam 2" that fades into a full-bore, head-down krautrock slow burn that somehow sounds like the most melodic of Can's repertoire and Sonic Youth at their most effective improv stages "Mountain Movers" is a tour de force. Bandleader Dan Greene's songwriting hits home when it needs to, but leaves pockets open for the band to stretch out and really find a way inside the songs themselves. "Mountain Movers" is a vinyl-only release, pressed on black vinyl and silver vinyl in a limited run of 500 copies, and includes a insert.